alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
[personal profile] alexseanchai
So today the physician assistant at the rheumatologist told me I'm hypermobile and my chronic pain is in large part from overextended muscles and tendons because of my joints being hypermobile. Which, okay, that probably explains why I can't stretch without hitting owwww before actually hitting stretch? Also, maybe fibromyalgia, here go get blood work.

Consequently I'm looking at this Prevention.com article with some suspicion. "Start by positioning yourself until you feel a slight stretch in the muscle, then hold the stretch for a full minute for the most benefit." Yeah no the point of this exercise is to reduce my pain levels, thanks...

Does anyone have good resources on this sort of thing? Because I'm supposed to get into a low-impact exercise routine. But I know perfectly well that if it hurts worse, I won't.
subluxate: Sophia Bush leaning against a piano (Default)
[personal profile] subluxate
Here's a video made by a woman, just a little younger than me, with EDS. Her symptoms don't match mine exactly (I didn't have full dislocations as a kid, none that landed me in the hospital, and I figured out how to reseat my knees early on, and I don't have any heart symptoms), but none of us have identical symptoms.



[livejournal.com profile] ashbet originally linked that.


On a similar note:

Every time a joint slips or dislocates, the soft tissue connected to that joint — tendons, ligaments, muscle, fascia, blood vessels — all stretches. Because of the structural defect in collagen, all that connected tissue is stretched beyond what normal should be; high resolution MRIs reveal microtrauma, microscopic tears that start up the inflammation and coagulation cascades. But because each joint can subluxate over and over in just a single day, these microtraumas happen over and over in the same tissue without healing successfully. This was first pointed out as an EDS problem in July 2011 by Dr. Clair Francomano in her comments while presenting at the EDNF Conference: “Microtears are not visible with ordinary MRIs but are experienced by EDSers, causing pain and instability.” Dr. Francomano’s, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Update 2011: What We Know — And What We Don’t Know, available from http://bit.ly/HQDNwk.)


This explains, better than I ever could, what is wrong with my ankle: it subluxated very badly one day, kept sliding out of place the same day, got worse and worse, and now it's extremely hypermobile, prone to subluxation and dislocation moreso than my left ankle as a result, hurts like all hell...

That link, by the way, is a good one if you want to read about the 2011 Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation Learning Conference presentations. I got this quote from [personal profile] morgandawn.

[x-posted from my journal at [personal profile] trialia's request.]
trialia: River Song (Alex Kingston) drinking a cup of coffee. (Default)
[personal profile] trialia
Excellent article here with an interview with Professor Rodney Grahame - for those who don't know, he's one of the best-known and highest-ranked experts in connective tissue disorders in England, based out of London's University College Hospital. The article and interview talk about hypermobility syndrome and the similarity of it and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type 3 to each other.

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb4365/is_20_43/ai_n56630979/

Also, ow, my ribs hurt. Dammit EDS.
subluxate: Sophia Bush leaning against a piano (Default)
[personal profile] subluxate
I went to sleep wearing two knee braces. They're neoprene with Velcro to secure them, and there are four Velcro straps to tighten it better when the neoprene is secured. They're hinged, and there are gel circles that go around the kneecaps. I don't usually wear them to sleep, but since I woke up yesterday in quite some pain because my left knee subluxated, I wanted to prevent that if possible.

Somehow, even with the braces, my left kneecap slid again--downward this time, not to the side.

Any advice on keeping them in place?

Welcome!

Dec. 23rd, 2011 06:42 pm
trialia: River Song (played by Alex Kingston) smiling serenely at the camera while saying 'There's always a way out.' (who] river - always a way out)
[personal profile] trialia
Hello and welcome, to anyone who comes across this community!

Please, if you have any interest in EDS of any type or all types, or hypermobility syndrome, stick around! :) You don't have to have the condition to join the community. I hope to build this into a good resource for support and research for people who do have EDS and their friends and families, and anyone who's just interested in learning about it.

I wish everyone the very best in dealing with what is a very complicated illness, especially if you are here looking for information because you've just been diagnosed with it. I plan on making a comprehensive link list to sites that provide accurate information about the various types and posting new medical articles I find, or linking to them, in the future. If anyone would like to help me do this for a specific type of EDS - I have hypermobility type without significant crossover features, so I'm not as 'up on' new research for the other types as I am on my own - please let me know, I'd really appreciate the help.

Welcome, and I hope this community can be of use and help to you!

~ Trialia

Details about EDS and HMS, for those who are new to this. )

Profile

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome & HMS support + discussion

September 2017

S M T W T F S
     12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
242526 27282930

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Oct. 18th, 2017 08:57 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios